Evelyn Ginossi has been Selected as a Mentor with the Spain-based Accelerator Zarpamos

Evelyn Ginossi has been Selected as a Mentor with the Spain-based Accelerator Zarpamos

We are proud to announce Evelyn Ginossi is now a mentor with the Spain-based start-up accelerator Zarpamos.  Zarpamos  is an incubator/accelerator of digital projects specialized in mobile and web applications in Spain. The core of Zarpamos (which means “Setting Sail” in Spanish) is 3 associates: Manuel García as manager and responsible for the Accelerator. Ronsel Foundation as Expert in Business Training for entrepreneurs. And a Venture Capital Fund. Zarpamos gets actively involved in each project’s development putting together a follow up plan and making the most out of the different projects synergies. Zarpamos will negotiate with every professional involved a minimum share in the company and will continue actively participating in it even when they leave the accelerator. Click here to see the original story:  http://zarpamos.com/en/evelyn-ginossi-nuevo-mentor/ __________ We welcome as new mentor  Evelyn Ginossi,Attorney Transactional Business expert, live USA: For the past ten years, Evelyn Ginossi has accumulated a wide variety of experience in finance, consulting, and law. She has significant experience in structuring international and domestic transactions, equity and debt relationships, and negotiating contracts. Evelyn manages and directs all of the primary practice areas of IBV Advisory Group Inc. Evelyn also represents clients in the real estate aspects of mergers and acquisitions transactions and corporate real estate services matters. Evelyn has significant experience in handling foreign direct investment transactions by new entrants into the US and California markets and serves as outside general counsel for such companies. Evelyn received her undergraduate degree in Political Science with an emphasis in International Relations from the University of California, Santa Barbara, her Juris Doctor from Loyola Law School of Los Angeles, and her postgraduate certificate in Law from the University...
E-2 Treaty Investor Visa Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

E-2 Treaty Investor Visa Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

The E-2 Treaty Investor Visa is available for foreign nationals seeking to live in the U.S. to invest, develop, and manage the operations of a business.  The E-2 Visa is a great option for those would like to start a business – large or small.  Qualifying for the E-2 Visa entails submitting an extensive file to meet the specific requirements previously set forth in the article posted here. This FAQ represents our client’s most frequently asked questions on the FAQ.  While the answers are accurate, more information may be required depending on your particular circumstances, so please do not hesitate to contact our office with any follow-up questions. 1.            Can I get a Green Card with an E-2 Visa? An E-2 Visa is a non-immigrant visa and will not give the holder the ability to apply for a Green Card. Although the E-2 Visa holder will not be eligible for a Green Card, the E-2 Visa is often approved for a period of 5-years and can be renewed indefinitely for so long as the business is still in operation. For those applicants who otherwise qualify for an EB-5 visa (or any other immigrant visa category leading to a Green Card), take caution and consult an attorney prior to applying for the E-2 Visa.  Non-immigrant Visa categories require applicants to possess the intent to return home to their home country at some point; and applying for an Immigrant Visa category (e.g., EB-5) on its face demonstrates an intent to remain permanently in the U.S.  Thus, an application to remain permanently in the U.S. while on the E-2 Visa will land...
Forming a Corporation:  What are “Corporate Formalities” and Why are They Important?

Forming a Corporation: What are “Corporate Formalities” and Why are They Important?

There are many considerations a business owner must think through before deciding which business entity to select.  While a business owner may elect to do business as a sole proprietorship or as a partnership, he may inadvertently put his personal assets at risk by not implementing a structure that separates the individuals involved from the business itself.  A corporation is one business entity option that limits the business owners’ risk of loss to the amount of money invested in the business, provided that the corporation adheres to basic “corporate formalities”. If corporate formalities are not followed, the corporation will not be recognized as a corporation and both business owners and shareholders may open themselves p to personal liability.  When a corporation is found to have not followed corporate formalities, this is known as “piercing the corporate veil”, which opens up a shareholder’s personal assets. WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO ADHERE TO CORPORATE FORMALITIES Adherence to corporate formalities is often cited as a significant disadvantage for those who consider a Corporation as a business form and this is often why many instead opt for a Limited Liability Company (LLC).  In addition to entity maintenance and formalities, selecting the appropriate entity should also reflect tax, partnership structuring, and decision-making considerations, which is why individuals starting a new business should always seek qualified legal counsel and tax advice. The following are basics of corporate formalities which must be followed.  Keep in mind that each state has its own corporation laws, and in addition to corporate formalities may require different forms or documents to be filed on a regular basis. Bylaws. Bylaws are...
Foreign Investors and Entrepreneurs: The E-2 Treaty Investor Visa May Be the Right Fit for You.

Foreign Investors and Entrepreneurs: The E-2 Treaty Investor Visa May Be the Right Fit for You.

Many entrepreneurs and investors look to invest in the US market for any number of reasons.  Some become discouraged about moving to the US as a pipe dream; seeing it as a possibility available only to very large companies or high net worth individuals.  However, there is an option available to entrepreneurs, startups and investors which require substantially less capital than the $1 million required under the EB-5 green card investor visa. The E-2 Treaty Investor Visa is available to entrepreneurs, investors and business owners of treaty countries who seek to live in the U.S. to develop and direct the operations of a business.  The business can be large or small, so long as applicants meet the specific requirements outlined in this article. While the E-2 Visa Treaty Investor Visa does not grant an Investor or his family members eligibility for permanent residency (green card), this two-year visa option can be renewed indefinitely, for generally less than a $200,000 USD investment (depending on the type of business). This post gives an overview of the requirements of the E-2 Treaty Investor Visa, as well as investment requirements for the E-2 Treaty Investor Visa. OVERVIEW OF REQUIREMENTS 1.      Individual Must Be a National of a Treaty Country The E-2 Investor Trader Visa is available only to people from the countries under an existing treaty with the U.S.  Most common western countries are on the list (the UK, Ireland, Germany, Australia), as well as many countries from Asia (Thailand, the Philippines) and South America (Chile, Paraguay), to name a few.  Israel was also recently added to the list.  For a complete list...
What to Know About Forming an LLC in California for Your Business

What to Know About Forming an LLC in California for Your Business

This article takes a look at the fundamentals of an LLC, the difference between an LLC and other popular forms of ownership, and the importance of having a solid Operating Agreement in place.   What is an LLC? A limited liability company (“LLC”), is a popular form of business entity in California as it provides asset protection to its members while being easier to maintain than a corporation.  An LLC may have one or more owners (known as “members”), and may have different classes of owners. In addition, an LLC may be owned by any combination of individuals or business entities.  In general, all the members are shielded from individual liability for debts and obligations of the LLC. An LLC is formed by filing “Articles of Organization” with the California Secretary of State prior to conducting business.  A company can be formed on a routine basis usually in about 2-3 weeks, or on an expedited 24-hour basis for an additional filing fee. Either before or after filing its Articles of Organization, the LLC members must enter into a written Operating Agreement signed by all the parties involved, both managers and members. An LLC is typically managed by its members, unless the members agree to have a manager handle the LLC’s business affairs.  The level of the involvement of the members in the day-to-day affairs is generally established in the Operating Agreement and varies depending on the structure of the business. An LLC’s life is perpetual in nature. However, the members may agree to a date or event of termination. What Are Some Differences Between an LLC and a Partnership or...
SEC Removes Prohibition on General Solicitation and General Advertising in Certain SEC Offerings

SEC Removes Prohibition on General Solicitation and General Advertising in Certain SEC Offerings

Background Under the current SEC offering process, companies seeking to raise capital through the sale of securities must either register the securities offering with the SEC or rely on an exemption from registration. Most of the exemptions from registration prohibit companies from engaging in general solicitation or general advertising – that is, advertising in newspapers or on the Internet among other things – in connection with securities offerings. Rule 506 of Regulation D is the most widely-used exemption from registration. In an offering that qualifies for the Rule 506 exemption, an issuer may raise an unlimited amount of capital from an unlimited number of “accredited investors” and up to 35 non-accredited investors. Under SEC rules, accredited investors are individuals who meet certain minimum income or net worth levels, or certain institutions such as trusts, corporations, or charitable organizations that meet certain minimum asset levels. JOBS Act In April 2012, Congress passed the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act (JOBS Act). Section 201(a)(1) of the JOBS Act directs the SEC to remove the prohibition on general solicitation or general advertising for securities offerings relying on Rule 506 provided that sales are limited to accredited investors and an issuer takes reasonable steps to verify that all purchasers of the securities are accredited investors. By requiring the SEC to remove this general solicitation restriction, Congress sought to make it easier for a company to find investors and thereby raise capital. While issuers will be able to widely solicit and advertise for potential investors, the JOBS Act required the SEC to adopt rules that “require the issuer to take reasonable steps to verify that...